UCAT Test Format Changes

Ahead of the 2022 sitting of the UCAT, changes have been made to the format of the Admissions Test.

Author: Chloe Hewitt

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The UCAT Consortium has made some changes to the Admissions Test which will apply to those sitting it from 2022.

Preparing for the UCAT is essential to being successful on the Admissions Test so knowing the changes is paramount.

We will go over everything you need to know about the UCAT changes.

Summary of the UCAT changes

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Abstract Reasoning Changes

The main change to the Abstract Reasoning section of the UCAT for 2022 is that there will be five fewer questions, going from 55 questions to 50.

The timing of the section has been adjusted accordingly with candidates having one minute less than in previous years, for a total of 12 minutes.

 With the reduction in time being proportionate to the reduction in question, candidates will continue to have approximately 14 seconds to answer each of the Abstract Reasoning questions.

Quantitative Reasoning Changes

In previous years, candidates had 24 minutes to answer the 36 questions that make up the Quantitative Reasoning section.

However, this has been increased to 25 minutes to answer the same number of questions. Candidates will now have about 41.5 seconds to answer the questions as opposed to the 40 seconds previously.

The intention of this is to reduce the overall time pressure in both the Admissions Test and the QR section.

With such a marginal change, candidates should not significantly alter their timing strategy for the QR questions.

However, candidates should be aware that they may have more ‘luxury’ time at the end of the section that will allow them to return to any questions they flagged for review.

Situational Judgement Changes

In what is the most significant change to the UCAT is in the Situational Judgement section. The number of questions has been reduced from 69 to 66.

In general, this is from the removal of an appropriateness style question.

Despite the reduction of the section by three questions, the timing of the section will not change meaning candidates will still have 26 minutes to tackle the SJT section.

This means candidates will have more time to answer the questions, averaging an extra second per question.

However, candidates will face a new type of question which is likely to be more time-consuming than others in the subtest so students should not significantly alter their timing.

New Situational Judgement Question Format

The brand new question format is similar to previous SJT questions, however, the structure and components will vary.

Building on the popular ‘Importance’ questions of the SJT, candidates will be relieved to learn there is not much to learn about the question format.

The new question type will typically give candidates three factors and ask them to identify the most and least important of the selection relating to a given scenario.

It is expected that there will be a minimum of two to three questions of this style.

Conclusion

It is important to note that there have been no changes made to the Decision Making or Verbal Reasoning sections.

As well, it is important to realise that the UCAT as an Admissions Test is continually changing and will do so in years to come.

Candidates should not be put off by the changes, which really are incremental and should really be welcomed by candidates.

You will now have more time to answer Quantitative Reasoning questions and three less questions to answer in Situational Judgement.

Good luck in your UCAT!

Looking to score highly on the UCAT? 

The UCAT exam is a vital component of your Medicine application so scoring highly can mean the difference between an offer or rejection. At UniAdmissions, we are experts at boosting your UCAT score and maximising your chances of gaining a place to study Medicine.

 

Discover our UCAT Programme by clicking the button below to enrol and triple your chances of success.

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